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September 13th, 2011:

Gas Industry Has Image Problems, Says an Insider

American Energy Coalition - September 13th, 2011

A natural gas industry executive says the industry must work harder to improve its message in the face of growing public awareness about the controversial drilling technique know as hydraulic fracturing or "fracking," according to an article by NaturalGasWatch.org

Tisha Conoly-Schuller, president and CEO of the Colorado Oil & Gas Association, discussed the industry's image issues during a conference in Denver, Colo., on fossil fuel production. She cited a 2010 documentary firm on natural gas drilling as a game-changer in public perception. "I hate to credit the movie Gasland, but it's really changed the conversation," she said. 

"What we've seen in the last few years, and I hope it's peaking, is a completely heightened public awareness around hydraulic fracturing and an increase in active opposition," she said. Fracking is used in the majority of new natural gas wells. Drillers inject millions of gallons of pressurized water laced with chemicals into the ground to break up shale formations in order to recover the gas. The process has been linked to several environmental problems, including the pollution of drinking water with flammable methane gas. 

Conoly-Schuller denied allegations that fracking causes the emission of flammable methane gas from faucets and showerheads. "The flaming faucet -- that was disproven by the Colorado Oil & Gas Authority," she said. 

Conoly-Schuller said the favorable perception of the gas industry is only 7 percent in recent polls. "That's lower than Congress. The public does not believe us. We need someone else delivering our message for us." 

To read the NaturalGasWatch.org article, please click here.

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